?

Log in

Previous Entry | Next Entry

SV: Wither



This episode kicked ass, I thought. I loved how it continued to position people in terms of their seasonal arcs, and I thought it did an excellent job of blending character and relationship development with the Freak of the Week. It was fantastic that the Freak of the Week was not, in fact, a meteor freak but one of the Phantoms Clark released from the Zone. That's very appropriate, because in this season, Clark (like everyone else) is really an adult, and is making decisions not based on his childhood guilt (and the meteor showers he wasn't really responsible for), but must take responsibility for adult actions. He freed the faux Poison Ivy, and now he has to deal with her.

What was especially interesting, I thought, was that in an episode that was all about budding relationships, Clark clearly felt an instinctive connection to Faux Ivy (sorry, I have forgotten her name). I couldn't quite figure out why, when they first met, but clearly we're supposed to believe that he is drawn to her instinctively because she, like him, is alien to this world--and of course because of his increasing sense of isolation. It was very interesting, too, that in the list of people he's lost he gave to his mom, he includes Jor-El in the list with Jonathan and Lana. So maybe he is actually beginning to embrace his alienness a little more.

I really want to rewatch this whole episode before completely analyzing the new Lex/Clark dynamic, but based simply on my first viewing of that scene, the writers are clearly positioning both of them for their iconic identities. That scene was pure Luthor confronts Superman--there was not much of the Lex and Clark about it. And it's regrettable, in a way, that Clark is blaming Lex for Zod's actions, though it certainly makes character sense, since he's still very torn up about Lex and Lana. Still, even though I regret where Clark and Lex are, vis-a-vis each other, on the show, I loved that scene. It felt like the gloves were off, and both MR and TW rocked in it.

Of course, the show hasn't completely surrendered the subtext between Lex and Clark--Chloe's line to Lana about Lex not wanting a threesome actually made my jaw drop. Canonical acknowledgement of that particular side of the triangle, even to deny it, is fun to see!

Another reason I really want to rewatch this episode, though, is for all the scenes with Lex and Lana, both independently and together. I really have never loved Lana more than I did tonight. Like Clark learning to act like an adult and take responsibility for what he unleashed from the Phantom Zone, Lana is clearly more mature in this episode than we've ever seen her. I loved her initial conversation with Lex, especially the insight that Lex always wants what he can't have, and so she fears when he has her he will no longer want her. I sympathized with her dislike of the media's classification of her as another one of Lex's girls, and I really adored her reluctance in approaching Chloe. She recognized that their friendship had been strained, which was a wonderful bit of continuity, and I really loved her acknowledgment that her trust issues were really more about *her* than they were about the men that she dated. And I loved, loved, loved that Chloe put aside (for the most part) her trust issues about Lex and gave Lana the advice of a good friend.

And Lex--my god, if I hadn't already worshipped this show's Lex Luthor, I would have started tonight. He was wonderfully direct with Lana, that he was no longer going to pay for Clark's mistakes. And that story about his mom tore my heart to SHREDS, but using that story so strategically, to counter Lana's complaints about the press, was sheer Lexian manipulation, and I loved it. And I also loved his speech to her at the end, about how satisfaction is superior to happiness, since happiness is just a product of brain chemistry. Oh yes, that's the future Lex Luthor. And seamlessly seducing Lana by making her feel like she is different from all of his other girls was also completely smooth. (I do think Lex does place Lana in a special category, but at the same time he knows she needs to feel his relationship with her is different, and he's definitely using that to his ends).

And on a completely shallow note: he was absolutely GORGEOUS in that costume. And I feel sorry for the people who can't stand Lana, because I honestly thought that sex scene was the HOTTEST thing I'd ever seen on the show. I loved the symbolism of Lana taking away his armor, because it's so double-layered: she thinks she is getting underneath his shell, and he lets her think that (and maybe even lets himself think that), but he denies the possibility of happiness. And if happiness is merely brain chemistry, how much more so is love? This, my friends, is the slower (and better) road to iconic Lex Luthordom, and I am currently ecstatic at the way this season is shaping up.

And how fun that we got to compare the different couple dynamics: Lex/Lana, Lois/Oliver, and Chloe/Jimmy. I want to rewatch before I speculate more on the parallels/differences the show is setting up between these couples (for example: is Oliver's ability to completely predict Lois' responses suppose to mirror Lex's more subtle manipulations of Lana? Does Lois' refusal to do the predictable and kiss Oliver anyone a deliberate reversal of Lana taking the first step in the literal seduction scene? And isn't it interesting that of all the relationships, the only one right now where there is a clear dominant personality right now is Chloe/Jimmy?) But like I said, I want to rewatch before saying anything more definitive about parallelism. But I can say I loved watching all three of them.

Ok, moving to Lois: speaking of this episode being about taking adult responsibility, it was wonderful to see Lois accepting responsibility for her mistake--and not, I think, out of fear that Martha would fire her, but because she genuinely felt guilty about letting Martha down. And damn, she does good banter! I really loved seeing her with Oliver--so many great, quotable lines--and I also love the possibilities this romance sets up for her getting more involved this season. And they have great chemistry.

As do Chloe and Jimmy. I thought the two of them were completely adorable, actually. I forgive the writers that unbelievable trick in the ambulance just for the line "Did you just paddle me?" And I loved Jimmy being the reasonable one, trying to stop Chloe from endangering her life, but then going into to danger himself to prove himself to her.

Ok, I probably have more to say but I'm running out of steam. So much stuff in this episode to analyze, though, after the rewatch. And I think I may completely wear out the tape replaying the Lexana sex scene. Guh. I hope those two have lots and lots and lots of sex before their inevitable painful breakup.

Comments

( 29 comments — Leave a comment )
mkitty3
Oct. 13th, 2006 04:59 am (UTC)
Y'know, I hated this episode, but your episode analysis totally makes me want to go back and rewatch it! :D
norwich36
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:02 am (UTC)
Thanks! That's exactly how bop_radar made me feel about the entirety of season 4, so it's a great compliment.
clari_clyde
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:08 am (UTC)
I like contrasting Lois/Oliver vs. Lana/Lex if only because Lex and Lana seem to look for excuses to push the relationship forward despite their nigglings while Lois and Oliver look for excuses to delay their relationship (or rather, Lois delays and Oliver respects) despite their chemistry. And in between are Chloe and Jimmy going where they feel comfy. So I’ll be interested in seeing these relationships develop.

And of course Clark. Dude, Clark is involved in three threesomes at the moment. If he weren’t such a moper, he could be getting lots of action.
norwich36
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:12 am (UTC)
Seriously! He could at the very least be getting some Clexana and Chlarkimmy action going. (Is Chlarkimmy the proper term? Maybe Chimmyark? Oh, man, these mashed pairing names are so silly).

But good point about Lex and Lana pushing forward while Lois and Oliver both are holding back. I love Oliver and Lois together--great chemistry but even better banter, which is one of my favorite things.
bop_radar
Oct. 14th, 2006 05:28 am (UTC)
Lex and Lana seem to look for excuses to push the relationship forward despite their nigglings while Lois and Oliver look for excuses to delay their relationship
Yeah, good call--and spot on about Chloe/Jimmy being in between.

*giggle* re. Clark. Totally! He doesn't realise how much he could be getting...
roxymissrose
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:25 am (UTC)
I have nothing intelligent to say except as arfy as I think Lana is, that scene between the two of them was mind-blowingly hot--mostly because of MR. (mygod!) I loved Lex throwing Clark out of his house (and his life) The both of them were amazing in that scene. Just right, not once going over the top,imo.

Also, Clark had just *enormous* eyes through this whole ep, just riveting.

Note to the SVmakeup artists:Tone down the pancake just a bit, guys, we get it that no one is as young as they're written, okay?
norwich36
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:48 am (UTC)
Yeah, the bad makeup was pretty much my only complaint about this episode.

Really, I was quite impressed with TW's acting, too--he's gotten a lot better at the subtle stuff. That scene with him and MR just was awesome, I agree.

What a great and seasonally appropriate icon, btw!
roxymissrose
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:53 am (UTC)
beeej made it!

SNOOPY/LINUS--OTP!!
rumpuso
Oct. 13th, 2006 10:35 am (UTC)
OMG Yes! The Lana and Lois had so much pancake makeup on that it was absurd. I realize they were in costume, but for criminy's sakes! It was kinda gross and totally took AWAY from their beauty.
norwich36
Oct. 13th, 2006 01:57 pm (UTC)
Yeah, what was up with that? I actually think Lana has been looking very ethereal this season, but the Cleopatra makeup was just a little too much, and did not flatter her. THe same with Lois's. WTF, makeup people? Did you just hire someone new and inexperienced?
myownghost
Oct. 13th, 2006 11:02 am (UTC)
>I loved the symbolism of Lana taking away his armor, because it's so double-layered: she thinks she is getting underneath his shell, and he lets her think that...

yes, that's really nice imagery, isn't it? i liked it that they moved slowly and made lots of eye contact. but i also liked the way chloe suddenly lunged at jimmy after saying she wasn't going to neck with him. ha!

lex's smooth manipulation of lana in the scene where he tells about learning of his mother's death was beautifully subtle. he knew exactly what to say to get to her. he was excellent telling off clark, too. and i think you're right that TW was very good in that scene.

"did you just paddle me?" is a great line!
norwich36
Oct. 13th, 2006 01:56 pm (UTC)
Yeah, whoever thought up the staging of that particular sex scene really did a good job with the symbolism. And MR was particularly good in this episode, I thought; he manages to convey both his genuine affection for Lana and a sense of distance at the same time, that a part of him is now closed off and can never be touched.

I was actually expecting Chloe to lunge for Jimmy after making that speech, but I still enjoyed it. And I'm also enjoying the way TW is playing Clark's responses to their relationship: there's a hint of jealousy, just enough that people who want to read Chlark into it can, and people who just want to read it as a friend jealous of losing his best friend's main focus of attention can see it that way too.
myownghost
Oct. 13th, 2006 04:33 pm (UTC)
>a part of him is now closed off and can never be touched.

yes. *sigh* i think you're right. the lovely, pleased smiles from the early seasons seems to be gone, though there was one moment in a scene with lana when his voice seemed to me almost to sound like michael rosenbaum instead of lex. i can't remember the line, will have to go back and watch the tape later. he was very good, though.
myownghost
Oct. 13th, 2006 04:34 pm (UTC)
ack ack ack, "the lovely pleased smiles... SEEM to be gone." grammar mistakes embarrass me so badly. *blushing*
huzzlewhat
Oct. 13th, 2006 03:02 pm (UTC)
There was so much that was fascinating about that episode, and I loved the way all the plots for all the characters worked with and against each other. Chloe, Lois, Martha, Lana — all were dealing in a major or minor way about their identities vis a vis the men. Chloe was almost left out until that "Your Girl?" thing with Jimmy. Lana posed it explicitly — the threat of losing her identity to Lex. Martha was dealing with the fallout, of losing her balancing half, and flailing about for identity, with that strange speech in the beginning that was could easily have been passed off as about Clark, but was really all about her, and wondering who she was, and subsuming that whole question into "Clark's advisor" in the end. She's heading toward Lionel, and is clearly frightened of it, and what it says about her and her lack of wholeness in and of herself that she's heading there.

And damn, if they didn't strengthen the "compare and contrast" effect between Oliver and Lex, with each telling stories about the death of parents, and the differences in how and why they told those stories, and with each of them costuming the women in their lives, and the extent to which they were allowed by Lois and Lana to do so, and whether or not they accepted the payoff at the end. Really really fascinating stuff, and I've been turning it over in my head.

And in the middle of it yet separate from it all was Clark, whose identity as alien and alone was reinforced by his only tenuous connection to an alien plantlifeform who literally ate men alive from the inside out, and another crucifiction scene, and Clark alone at the end.
norwich36
Oct. 13th, 2006 04:50 pm (UTC)
Oh, you bring up some excellent points! I definitely agree with you that Martha's speech is as much about herself (and not recognizing herself anymore) as it is about Clark, and her own fears about her attraction to Lionel. "Everyone moves on in their own way" indeed. I thought it interesting in an episode that was so much about relationships, the Mionel relationship wasn't even really acknowledged, except covertly in that scene.

And you're right about the compare/contrast of Oliver and Lex, too. I had forgotten Oliver telling stories about his parents' death--that really underscores, for me, the idea that Lex telling Lana about his mom's death as an act of manipulation. (He's revealing himself to her, but in a very strategic way to make her feel that he is, vs. Oliver's admission to Lois, which was designed to make her feel guilty but which also felt much less scripted and more emotionally honest, to me.) And I did notice both of them were trying to costume their women, but only Oliver succeeded. Hmm. You're right that these parallels definitely deserve more thought.

nd in the middle of it yet separate from it all was Clark, whose identity as alien and alone was reinforced by his only tenuous connection to an alien plantlifeform who literally ate men alive from the inside out, and another crucifiction scene, and Clark alone at the end.

Yes, the crucifixion scene was interesting, and you just made me realize the way the show is intentionally mirroring, revisiting, and switching around themes from season 1. Lex is revealing himself to Lana in the way he used to reveal himself to Clark; Lana has taken Clark's symbolic role in his life. Meanwhile, Chloe has taken on the role of Lex, for Clark: she's the one that gets him down off the crucifix, this time, and also the one he goes to for advice and counsel, just the way he used to go to Lex. (So there's an actual symbolic reason for Chloe's expanded role--I hadn't thought of that before!)

Um, I wanted to say something about plant lady and her graphic penetration of all those vulnerable male bodies (good grief, that scene with Jimmy and the symbolic oral rape was pretty much the creepiest thing I've ever seen on the show), but I'm late for a meeting, so maybe more later.
bop_radar
Oct. 14th, 2006 05:26 am (UTC)
Great comment! I love what you bring up about the way the female characters are battling with the threat of losing their identities in their relationships with men. That'll be something to watch this season for sure.

amn, if they didn't strengthen the "compare and contrast" effect between Oliver and Lex, with each telling stories about the death of parents, and the differences in how and why they told those stories, and with each of them costuming the women in their lives, and the extent to which they were allowed by Lois and Lana to do so, and whether or not they accepted the payoff at the end.
*nods* That was all amazingly fascinating. I'd be really interested to read more about what you thought about this... I'm still thinking it through myself. I thought there was very clever balancing going on--because read one way, Lois was more at Oliver's mercy than Lana was at Lex's. Yet Lex is the more destructively manipulative of the two. It's an interesting tension.
cinderella81
Oct. 13th, 2006 05:18 pm (UTC)
I totally loved this episode!!!
bop_radar
Oct. 14th, 2006 05:18 am (UTC)
\o/ Wheeeeeee!!! Best episode ever!! Wheeeeeee!!!!! *squees insanely*
Sorry. I don't think I'll calm down until I've seen it ten more times. I think I loved it even more than you did. But on to the interesting stuff...

It was fantastic that the Freak of the Week was not, in fact, a meteor freak but one of the Phantoms Clark released from the Zone. That's very appropriate, because in this season, Clark (like everyone else) is really an adult, and is making decisions not based on his childhood guilt (and the meteor showers he wasn't really responsible for), but must take responsibility for adult actions. He freed the faux Poison Ivy, and now he has to deal with her.
*nods* I'm glad you covered this in your review. I didn't get to that in mine. So much to say! But yes, I agree that I like this alternative to the FoTW much better. It also works really well in the evolution of the show. In the past, there was such a disconnect between the projected image of characters (eg Lex as evil) and the reality of the show. Now the projection and the reality are sliding closer together--so having Clark's guilt be more based in fact now fits that feel perfectly. I don't know if I expressed that very well, but I've been thinking a lot about just how close we are now to the iconic figures of the future--as you point out about the Clex scene. And I feel this huge double layer at work on the show. Clark and Lex are almost their future selves, but they're also not--we have the old loyalties to them, to Lex in particular--this is going to be a heartbreaking season, I think.

if I hadn't already worshipped this show's Lex Luthor, I would have started tonight.
HaHA! Yes! Because of that wonderful double layering that's going on. He's both genuine AND manipulative, and I want him to end happily but I know he won't and... and ... *flails*

I do think Lex does place Lana in a special category, but at the same time he knows she needs to feel his relationship with her is different, and he's definitely using that to his ends
Yeah--from this description I think you and I are in the same place vis a vis the Lexana and how we view it--I totally second you on the final comment in your review too. ;-)

How hot was the costume!! I loved how this ep combined the shallow with the really, really deep. That's my Smallville!

I hear you on the need to rewatch before discussing relationship parallels.

Is Oliver's ability to completely predict Lois' responses suppose to mirror Lex's more subtle manipulations of Lana?
Interesting! I think Oliver and Lex are very close as characters. But Oliver lets Lois off the hook, as it were, whereas Lex pushes for closure/conquest. That parallel could come back to haunt us...

Does Lois' refusal to do the predictable and kiss Oliver anyone a deliberate reversal of Lana taking the first step in the literal seduction scene?
*nods* I'd say at one level it is. And the comparison between Lois and Lana is so interesting--Lois deliberately sidesteps the traditional romance and yet in doing so becomes the most desirable girlfriend for a superhero. Whereas Lana falls into classic female patterns--in the end, she accepts her place on a man's arm.

And isn't it interesting that of all the relationships, the only one right now where there is a clear dominant personality right now is Chloe/Jimmy?
Interesting. I read Lex as dominant in Lexana. But Lana's damn close to making it an equal partnership. I agree though that Chloe/Jimmy is a more obviously dominant/submissive relationship. Though the sheer charm and Chloe's obvious passion for him evens things up a little.

I forgive the writers that unbelievable trick in the ambulance just for the line "Did you just paddle me?"
Hee! Meeee toooo.

*huge squee*
norwich36
Oct. 14th, 2006 06:01 am (UTC)
YES: So close to their destinies, but not quite there. I agree about the heartbreak in this season--but you know, if they keep building it as well as they have in these first three eps, I'm actually looking forward to it.

I think we are in the same place on Lex and Lana, at least the Lexian part of the equation. A part of him want to be able to take off his armor for her, to really let her in. He wants to love her, but he believes that love destroys: not only does his love destroys others, but when he loves he is vulnerable to being destroyed. He cares about Lana for Lana--they've been through enough together--but also because of her symbolic association with Clark: she fills the same void Clark filled for him, and also she is (or was) Clark's, so if he can't have Clark he can have her.

By the way, I can't even remember where I made this comment, so I don't know if you saw it or not, but I suddenly had a theory earlier today about why Chloe has been superChloe, lately: because just as Lana has taken Clark's role in Lex's life, Chloe has taken Lex's role in Clark's life (though she retains her own role). This, I think, is why she had to be the one to rescue Clark from his crucifixion by Gloria: it was a deliberate parallelism to Lex getting Clark down from the cross in season 1. It's why she's gotten to be the more mature one for the past half-season or so, and in an interesting way it also explains the Chlarkish subtext: just as Clark's love for Lex was never textually acknowledged except for in certain on-screen gazes, so the Chlark is simultaneously acknowledged and denied in the way Clark now looks at Chloe.
bop_radar
Oct. 14th, 2006 06:30 am (UTC)
if they keep building it as well as they have in these first three eps, I'm actually looking forward to it.
Totally!! And yes, I agree one hundred percent with you about Lex in the Lexana relationship. It IS as if we share a brain! ;-)

ecause just as Lana has taken Clark's role in Lex's life, Chloe has taken Lex's role in Clark's life
I did see that, but the insights were coming so thick and fast, I confess I skimmed it. I like it now I think more thoroughly on it. I love the crucifixion parallelism. Actually I love the Chlarky subtext. That also helps explain why I'm most comfortable while the Chlark remains subtextual.
supacat
Oct. 14th, 2006 08:27 am (UTC)
because just as Lana has taken Clark's role in Lex's life, Chloe has taken Lex's role in Clark's life

This is really interesting although I don't instinctively 'feel' it the way you and K seem to. Do you mean Lex's role as confidant/advisor? I'd love to hear more on this theory. :-)

Although there were 2542 different ingredients in the mix, I felt that Clark's S1 pull towards Lex was in large part based on his attraction to Lex as a symbol of power and difference, because he yearned to express his own power and difference. Lex represented Other to Clark in a way that Clark was drawn to, and I don't get that vibe from Chloe. (?)
norwich36
Oct. 14th, 2006 04:48 pm (UTC)
Yes, I see the distinction you're making there. You're right, I meant more the confidant/advisor role, as well as the person he goes to when he can't solve things on his own (since he no longer has access to Lex's resources). But also, in general, the "slightly more mature best friend" slot, not so much the "mysterious Other he is ineluctably drawn to." But I wonder if the evolution of superChloe isn't supposed to be replacing the power side of the Lexian equation, too--she's not rich, but she does have lots of connections and skills. But she can't quite replace Lex, I agree, because she doesn't represent difference to Clark the way Lex did--so he's also drawn to strange alien women who can penetrate him!
huzzlewhat
Oct. 14th, 2006 12:02 pm (UTC)
I can't even remember where I made this comment, so I don't know if you saw it or not, but I suddenly had a theory earlier today about why Chloe has been superChloe, lately:.

You said that in response to my initial response to your/this post, above... if you're looking for it!
norwich36
Oct. 14th, 2006 04:49 pm (UTC)
Thanks! You would think I could learn to keep track of what I said when. :D
huzzlewhat
Oct. 14th, 2006 11:58 am (UTC)
norwich36 wrote: It was fantastic that the Freak of the Week was not, in fact, a meteor freak but one of the Phantoms Clark released from the Zone. That's very appropriate, because in this season, Clark (like everyone else) is really an adult, and is making decisions not based on his childhood guilt (and the meteor showers he wasn't really responsible for), but must take responsibility for adult actions. He freed the faux Poison Ivy, and now he has to deal with her.

and bop responded:I agree that I like this alternative to the FoTW much better. It also works really well in the evolution of the show.</i>

I definitely agree with this. While initially a great storytelling device, the meteor mutants are also an inbuilt inertia-point for Smallville... as long as they are the primary narrative threat and challenge to Clark's abilities, it makes perfect character sense for Clark to stick to Smallville. If he felt responsible for the havoc they wrought on the town, how could he ever leave the town? if the writers and show runners want to move Clark out into the larger world, they have to give him different challenges. I like the idea of the Phantom Zone fugitives not only because they're a shift from things Clark feels responsible for to things that Clark really is responsible for, but also that they're a shift from things that happen in Smallville to things that are happening elsewhere in the world (even if the stories are played out on the familiar Smallville sets). Clark's eventual role as Superman will be a combination of both stages so far. He'll take on burdens of the whole world that he has no direct responsibility for (he'll just lose the guilt), but he will belong to the whole world, not just one town.
bop_radar
Oct. 14th, 2006 11:23 pm (UTC)
also that they're a shift from things that happen in Smallville to things that are happening elsewhere in the world
*nods* Yes, good call. He's being drawn out of Smallville more and more.

He'll take on burdens of the whole world that he has no direct responsibility for (he'll just lose the guilt), but he will belong to the whole world, not just one town.
Yes. I'm looking forward to seeing him move towards that, so I'm really pleased to see the writers supporting that with a formula that nudges things that one step closer.
supacat
Oct. 14th, 2006 08:35 am (UTC)
And seamlessly seducing Lana by making her feel like she is different from all of his other girls was also completely smooth. (I do think Lex does place Lana in a special category, but at the same time he knows she needs to feel his relationship with her is different, and he's definitely using that to his ends).

Great reading of Lex. I also felt like there was a lot of careful positioning going on: telling Lana that he'd never had any of them live with him before was a lie, because even if Victoria and Desiree don't count, Lex gave Helen a key, not just to the mansion, but to the most private room in it. Although Lex delivered the lie so smoothly that like so much of what he said in the episode it blurred the line between lying to Lana and lying to himself.
norwich36
Oct. 14th, 2006 08:28 pm (UTC)
Oh, I like that interpretation of his statement. (I was just reading it as Lex saying he had never asked any of the diamond earring girls to move in--I thought that's who the "Lex girls" were, not every woman he has ever had a relationship with.) But you're right that he actually let Helen in a lot further.

Hmm. The Helen/Lana parallels are actually kind of interesting, because much of Lex's self-revelation to Helen also read to me as a calculated self-revelation, at the time; he was trying to get her to trust him by deliberate displays of openness. I'm still really uncertain as to whether he actually did love Helen; that whole relationship felt like gamesmanship to me, whereas it's easier for me to see Lex's actual affection for Lana along with the gamesmanship. It's ironic (and tragic) that Lex, at this stage of his emotional development, can never fully love Lana, whereas I think he might have truly been able to love Helen had she not been playing him the whole time.
( 29 comments — Leave a comment )

Profile

Nora (KK glasses)
norwich36
Nora Norwich

Latest Month

December 2016
S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Lilia Ahner